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Private Robert Charles Boreham, Private George Arthur Fish (pictured), and Private Harold James Gorman, the Machine Gun Corps (Infantry)

October 10, 2019

 

Remembering the Fallen:  on this day in 1917, Private Robert Charles Boreham, Private George Arthur Fish (pictured), and Private Harold James Gorman, all serving with the Machine Gun Corps (Infantry), were killed in action during the Battle of Poelcapelle.

Private Boreham was 21 years old at the time of his death.  He had been born in Plaistow, London, and after leaving school had worked as an indoor boy at The Barton (now a listed building) in Laneast.  He enlisted with the Worcester Regiment at Launceston, and later transferred to 202nd Company, the Machine Gun Corps.  Private Boreham met his death during the Battle of Poelcapelle, which marked the end of several successful attacks during the Third Battle of Ypres.  He lies buried in the Dochy Farm New British Cemetery (part of which is pictured above) at Langemark-Poelcappe in West-Vlaanderen in Belgium

Private Fish was 30 years old and married with a small daughter at the time of his death.  He had been born in Great Witchingham in Norfolk, and lived with his wife in Fakenham before serving in the Great War with 199th Company, the Machine Gun Corps (Infantry).  One of his officers wrote to Private Fish’s wife after his death to let her know that her husband, described as a gallant man, had been killed in action.  The officer assured her that he had made a note of the burial site, but there is now no known grave and so he is remembered on the Tyne Cot Memorial near Ypres.  On his memorial card are the words, “Death divides, memory clings.”

Private Gorman was 19 years old at the time of his death, when he was killed in action while serving with 199th Company, the Machine Gun Corps (Infantry).  He was born in Plympton in Devon, and had a younger brother who also enlisted in 1915;  his brother survived the war and returned to their parents in 1918.  Private Gorman has no known grave and his name graces the memorial at the Plympton St. Maurice Church.  He is also remembered on the Tyne Cot Memorial near Ypres.

 

 

 

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December 11, 2018

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